Fairford History Society

Monthly Archives: December 2006

Valentine Strong – Cotswold Stonemason

by Chris Hobson

 

Valentine Strong's Tomb

Valentine Strong’s Tomb

(FHS Occasional Paper No 3)

Published by Fairford History Society. December 2006

Price 70p Click here to Download the Paper

Valentine Strong was a well-known Cotswold stonemason who built Andrew Barker’s Fairford Park mansion house and was the father of Thomas and Edward Strong, Sir Christopher Wren’s master masons in the rebuilding of St Paul’s Cathedral following the Grea

t Fire of London. Valentine Strong died in Fairford in 1662 and is buried under an impressive

bale tomb in St Mary’s churchyard.

 

 

November 16th 2006: Medical Services In Fairford by June Lewis-Jones

June Lewis-Jones gave an informative and entertaining talk on medical practices in the town from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century. Medical men mentioned during the talk included:

  • Thomas Fayreford who treated people throughout the West Country in the 16th Century including at least one Fairford resident
  • Mr Ducket a licensed surgeon in the town in the mid-18th Century
  • and the Iles, Cornwall and Bloxsome dynasties of doctors serving the town in the 19th and 20 centuries

Also covered were the Retreat lunatic asylum, the Pest House at Burdocks, Fairford Workhouse, Fairford Cottage Hospital and the fundraising efforts of the Carnival for the hospital. The talk was illustrated by pictures from June’s own collection.

Pictures courtesy of June

Fairford Workhouse

Fairford Workhouse

Laying the foundation stone of Fairford Hospital 1887 Laying the foundation stone of Fairford Hospital 1887

Lewis-Jones

June Lewis-Jones gave an informative and entertaining talk on medical practices in the town from the Middle Ages to the 20th Century. Medical men mentioned during the talk included:

  • Thomas Fayreford who treated people throughout the West Country in the 16th Century including at least one Fairford resident
  • Mr Ducket a licensed surgeon in the town in the mid-18th Century
  • and the Iles, Cornwall and Bloxsome dynasties of doctors serving the town in the 19th and 20 centuries

Hospital Foundation

Family and Local History Day at Fairford Library

Family and Local History Day

Wednesday November 15th 2006

Family History Day

A total of 190 people visited Fairford Library on November 16th for a very successful Family and Local History Day. Gloucestershire Archives, Gloucestershire Family History Society, Lechlade History Society and, of course, Fairford History Society were all represented and were able to help with many family and local history enquiries. FHS also mounted a display of local information and photographs. It was a most successful and enjoyable day and is planned to be repeated next year.

University of Gloucestershire

Thursday November 23rd 2006

Two of our members were recently invited to talk to third year history students at the University of Gloucestershire about the Fairford Community Centre project and the formation of Fairford History Society.

Professor Tim Copeland, who was Heritage advisor for the project’s successful application to the Heritage Lottery Fund, invited Margaret Bishop, the project co-ordinator, and Geoff Bishop, leader of the FHS Oral History group, to talk to students who were examining different ways in which material becomes public history. They told students about the history of the building, opened in 1738, and its pioneer role in education, and about the Heritage Days held to interest the public in the project and Fairford’s heritage generally. The two Heritage Days produced a large amount of historical material and made it clear that there is a great deal of local interest in the history of Fairford throughout the ages, although much of it was previously unrecorded and unavailable. This led to the foundation of the Fairford History Society and the starting up of the Fairford Archive to ensure that our heritage is preserved and not lost over the years.

Extracts from oral History recordings illustrated the point that oral recording captures a different sort of history, with more human reactions, and gives a fuller picture than written records alone.